Pancreatic cancer initially has very few symptoms, so it often goes undiagnosed.  That's unfortunate, as approximately 1.6 percent of adults in the US will be diagnosed with pancreatic cancer at some point.  The 5-year survival rate for patients treated for pancreatic cancer is only 8.5%.

That's all pretty daunting.  Researchers are actively seeking better treatment, but it would help if they could detect this cancer at an earlier stage.

People with pancreatic cancer had different tongue microbiota than healthy individuals, specifically low levels of Haemophilus and Porphyromonas bacteria, and high levels of Leptotrichia Fusobacterium

A team of researchers from Zhejiang University in Hangzhou, China decided to look into how human tongue microbiota could act as a diagnostic tool for pancreatic cancer, collecting tongue coating samples. 

They found that people with pancreatic cancer had different tongue microbiota than healthy individuals, specifically low levels of Haemophilus and Porphyromonas bacteria, and high levels of Leptotrichia and Fusobacterium.  With more studies to confirm, this could prove to be a great diagnositc tool, that could catch pancreatic cancer early, and improve outcomes of treatment.

The researchers suspect that the development on pancreatic cancer may affect the immune system and affect the growth of certain bacteria over others.  Further research is needed.

Read more at Science Daily
Taylor & Francis Group. (2019, January 28). Tongue microbiome could help identify patients with early-stage pancreatic cancer. ScienceDaily. Retrieved January 29, 2019 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2019/01/190128191451.htm

 

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