Cancer, Health and Diet Related News

Doxorubicin is a widely used as a component of chemotherapy regimes; however, the use of doxorubicin is associated with severe cardiotoxicity. It is unclear exactly how doxorubicin promotes cardiotoxicity, but it has been proposed that doxorubicin-associated cardiomyopathy develops as the result of reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and iron accumulation.
3 months 1 week ago
Latest Cancer News/Research
A study has detailed new findings that researchers say confirm the anticancer properties of a newly discovered agent called FL118. The investigators say their findings are "promising" and open doors for further research into the compound.Their results were published in the journal Molecular Pharmaceutics.The research team, led by Dr.
3 months 1 week ago
Latest Cancer News/Research
Jane Johnson

Whole, slivers, sections, pulp, no pulp… no matter how you cut it, oranges are fabulous. Their skin smells great and even sprays cool oils when you squish it – so neat! Bright orangey delights are around every corner at Whole Foods Market right now, because darlin’ clementine… it’s citrus season, and Whole Kids Foundation is joining in the fun!

To celebrate citrus this season, we want to share two great resources with you, parents!

Our monthly downloadable resource is all about making one small, affordable change to improve your family’s nutrition, and this edition is orange all over! There are tasty tips for parents, a fun DIY activity for your kids, family-friendly recipes and suggestions on how to go a step further in the kitchen with our friend, the orange. Give it a download!

Every month we suggest a new book (for ages 3-7) that opens the door for healthy conversation with your kiddo. Look for reading tips from our partner, Jumpstart, and a neat “Together-Time” activity from us, Whole Kids Foundation. We think you’ll love this month’s activity, “Find Your Main Squeeze.”

Does your family revel in citrus season? Share your favorite tips below for including this great treat in your child’s meals. 

winnie.hsia@gmail.com
3 months 1 week ago
Nutrition, Mind, Body
The Editors at Food52.com

It’s official: we're deep into post-holiday season detox. Eating more whole grains, happily, falls into this lifestyle.

Here are six great winter grain recipes to discover now – and carry with you into the new year.

Photo by James Ransom

Recipe: Celery and Za’atar Tabouli

Run-of-the-mill tabouli has a way of getting water-logged too easily. By replacing the traditional tomato and cucumber with sturdy nuts and crunchy celery, this version has effectively solved that problem. 

Photo by Joseph De Leo

Recipe: Quinoa and Kale Crustless Quiche

Kale and quinoa are a match made in heaven, and it turns out they're even better when you throw some eggs and cheese into the mix. If raw garlic isn't your thing, toss it in with the onions right before they're finished caramelizing -- we enjoyed the mild bite.

Photo by James Ransom

Recipe: Jeweled Millet

Spicy, crunchy chickpeas, nutty almonds and sweet, caramelized onions transform basic millet. If you’re not 100% vegan, eat this with a large spoonful of plain yogurt. 

Photo by James Ransom

Recipe: Freekeh Salad with Fennel and Mint

No need to get freaky with freekeh: just keep it simple. With a few herbs, fennel, and acid, you can transform the grain into something to make over and over. Pack this up for a brown bag lunch and make your colleagues jealous.

Photo by Sarah Shatz

Recipe: Farro Salad with Roasted Mushrooms and Parmesan

The synthesis of flavors between the roasted mushrooms and nutty faro here is spot on. The entire dish is perfumed with Parmesan, which, instead of being grated, had been crumbled into tiny pebbles.  

Photo by James Ransom

Recipe: Quinoa Cookies with Coconut & Chocolate Chunks

If you are going to have dessert, this is the one to indulge in. Of course we love these cookies because the quinoa makes us feel like we can eat more than one, but even better is the chewy texture and earthy flavor it brings to them. Different from your average chocolate chip, and that's exactly why we love them.

Tell us: What are your favorite ancient grain recipes to make in winter? Share your comments below. 

winnie.hsia@gmail.com
3 months 1 week ago
Nutrition, Mind, Body
New research by scientists at the University of Exeter has shown that cells demonstrate remarkable flexibility and versatility when it comes to how they divide - a finding with potential links to the underlying causes of many cancers.
3 months 1 week ago
Latest Cancer News/Research
CRC-PRO, or Colorectal Cancer Predicted Risk Online, is designed to help both patients and physicians determine when screening for colorectal cancer is appropriate. Current guidelines recommend patients are screened at the age of 50. However, with this new tool, physicians will be better able to identify who is truly at risk and when screenings for patients are necessary.
3 months 1 week ago
Latest Cancer News/Research
By C. E. Huggins NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - Black and Hispanic people and other minorities tend to know less about skin cancer than whites, a new study suggests. "Our findings emphasize the need for improved patient education about characteristics of melanoma, regardless of race," researchers led by Dorota Z. Korta, of the NYU Langone Medical Center in New York, wrote. People of all races are ...
3 months 1 week ago
Latest Cancer News/Research
(MedPage Today) -- Detecting malaria parasites' digestive waste products noninvasively with a photoacoustic device passed initial bench tests and animal studies. Also this week: rabbit-free cosmetics testing.
3 months 2 weeks ago
Latest Cancer News/Research
An ancient Chinese herbal remedy could be used to fight chronic pain, new research has revealed.The roots of the flowering plant Corydalis – a member of the poppy family - have been used for centuries as a pain reliever. Now scientists have found they contain a key pain-relieving ingredient known as dehydrocorybulbine (DHCB) and that they do not lose effectiveness over time like traditional opiate drugs.The chemical acts not through the morphine receptor but through other receptors, in particular one that binds dopamine. Dopamine is a neurotransmitter that helps control the brain's reward and pleasure centres and also helps regulate movement and emotional responses.Olivier Civelli of the University of California, Irvine, said: ‘Our study reports the discovery of a new natural product that can relieve pain.  This analgesic acts in animal assays against the three types of pain that afflict humans, including acute, inflammatory, and neuropathic or chronic pain.’He made the discovery as part of the ‘herbalome’ project, an effort to catalogue all of the chemical components of traditional Chinese medicine. The Corydalis plants that were the focus of the new study grow mainly in central eastern China, where underground tubers are harvested, ground, and boiled in hot vinegar.  Those concoctions are often prescribed to treat pain, including headaches and back pain.
Source  - Daily Mail
3 months 2 weeks ago
Nutrition, Mind, Body
Higher levels of maternal vitamin D during pregnancy have been linked to better muscle development in children, say researchers.The study on 678 children, published in Endocrine Research,  showed vitamin D levels in the womb were linked to grip strength at the age of four. The team at the University of Southampton say the muscle boost could persist throughout life. Trials are taking place to see how effective pregnancy supplements are.Most vitamin D is made by the skin when exposed to sunlight and supplements are offered during pregnancy.Some doctors have  voiced concerns about vitamin D deficiency as people become more "sun aware" and have linked it with a range of health problems.The team at the University of Southampton investigated the impact of the vitamin in pregnancy. Blood samples were taken 34 weeks into the pregnancy and the vitamin D levels were compared with how tightly their children could squeeze a device in their hand at the age of four. The results showed that women with high levels of vitamin D in the late stages of pregnancy were more likely to have children with greater muscle strength.Dr Nicholas Harvey told the BBC that: "There's some evidence that 'fast' muscle fibres go down in vitamin D deficiency and you get more fat in muscle. If there is deficiency in utero then they may end up with a lower number of numbers of these 'fast' muscle fibres."Source  - BBC
3 months 2 weeks ago
Nutrition, Mind, Body

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