Cancer, Health and Diet Related News

“In the long run, we shape our lives, and we shape ourselves.  The process never ends until we die.  And the choices we make are ultimately our own responsibility.”
― Eleanor Roosevelt

Here I was flying over my favorite city in the entire world (Austin, TX) in a beautiful jet black multi-million dollar helicopter.  This same exact helicopter had flown Brad Pitt over the city only a week prior.

The experience was a reward from one of my clients for helping her execute a successful online business launch earlier in the year that made six figures in six weeks.  Yeah, that’s no typo.  Six figures in six weeks!

A couple years ago if you would have told me I could help create $100K online for someone throughout my entire LIFETIME (let alone within six weeks), I would have called you bananas.  Now, those numbers aren’t impossible for me to wrap my mind around.

But this kind of personal growth didn’t always come easy for me.

And life wasn’t always this adventurous or awesome.

SMALL TOWN GAL, BIG TIME DREAMS

I distinctly remember (more…)

Kendra Wright
3 months 2 weeks ago
Nutrition, Mind, Body
Kathy K. Downie, RD, LD

Chai Almond Smoothie Recipe

Unlike high fiber or mise en place, there is no true scientific or culinary definition for the term superfood. In fact, this popular group of foods with a lengthy list of purported health claims is sometimes shunned by nutrition experts (myself included!) because it elevates certain foods in the popularity contest while ignoring other less exotic, beautiful or virtuous ingredients. Not one to pit one ingredient over another, we selected several foods we think are super — not to be used exclusively or at the expense of the rest of your spice rack and produce crisper — because they are minimally processed and are nutrient-dense or packed with a few nutrients. These are great additions to your repertoire. (But please don’t ignore your celery and smoked paprika! Variety is the spice of life, and that is super indeed.)

Turmeric: This vivid orange powder (from a root that looks like a small orange cousin of fresh ginger) is loaded with iron. One teaspoon of ground turmeric (which could fit nicely in a veggie smoothie) has 1.65 grams of iron: almost one-tenth of your daily needs. That little spoon also has nearly three-fourths a gram of fiber and little sodium or calories to boot.

Spirulina: Scientists are hard at work determining the healthy benefits (if any) from consuming this seaweed derivative. However, we can confirm it works and tastes just fine in smoothies when using the dried powdered option. Additionally, one tablespoon of dried spirulina contains a whopping four grams of protein and two grams of iron (both boons for vegetarians or vegans!) plus small amounts of B vitamins for just 20 calories. 

Goji berries: We like the dried option of these vibrant red, sweet-tart berries — also known as wolfberries — for a snack (try them as an alternate for golden raisins) or tossed in a smoothie or hot cereal. Even though they are not the fountain of youth, these berries pack a nutritional punch: Two tablespoons of the berries contain loads of vitamin A, plus small amounts of iron, protein and fiber.

Hemp seeds: An old favorite for smoothies or hot cereals, this seed delivers a complete protein (if you like to keep track!) full of essential fatty acids (as in, the ones we have to eat because our body can’t produce them). Three tablespoons of the nutty-tasting seeds contain 9 grams of protein, 11 grams of heart-healthy polyunsaturated fats and about 1 gram of iron. In addition, those tiny seeds contain some magnesium, iron and zinc.

Maca powder: This mild-tasting powder comes from a Peruvian root long used for medicinal purposes. Most of its touted powers are from stories and not science (at least not yet!). But you can still use this powder to great effect in smoothies. One teaspoon of the powder contains some carbohydrate; small amounts of fiber, potassium and iron.

Lucuma powder: Here’s another super ingredient from South America that offers a sweet deal for smoothies. Two teaspoons provide 2 grams of fiber for just 20 calories. The powder, made from a South American fruit, is a tasty addition to your pantry.

Chia seeds: These teeny seeds have a huge amount of fiber, which is why chia seeds plus liquid result in a pudding-like gel. But that’s not all: One ounce (nearly 7 teaspoons) has almost 10 grams fiber, 6.5 grams polyunsaturated (healthy) fats, about 4.5 grams protein and 140 calories along with smaller amounts of iron, zinc and calcium. Use these tasteless seeds in smoothies, granolas or hot cereals.

What is your favorite “superfood”? How do you use it?

Looking for more inspiration? Check out our interactive Smoothie BuilderMix and match a blend and get its nutritional profile. 

Kathy K. Downie, RD, LD
3 months 2 weeks ago
Nutrition, Mind, Body
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The new year means new routines, new goals, and new tweaks to daily life. If your goal is to cook more dinners from home, you’ve come to the right place. Meal planning is a key to home-cooked success. We’ve picked seven recipes that will help you put a delicious dinner on the table every night this week.

Perfect Cacio e Pepe Recipe

Engine 2 Baked Potato Recipe – Health Starts Here, Gluten Free, Vegan, Vegetarian

Beef Paprikash Recipe

Chicken and Brown Rice Soup RecipeHealth Starts Here

Creamy Cashew “Risotto” with Butternut Squash Recipe – Health Starts Here, Vegan, Vegetarian

Learn to Cook: Broiled Fish with Citrus and Herbs Recipe – Gluten Free

Veggie-Packed Toad-in-the-Hole Recipe

What are you making this week?

Megan Myers
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Men who consume red wine and blueberries and take regular exercise can cut their risk of developing erectile dysfunction by over a fifth, a new study has shown.Scientists have identified that foods rich in certain flavonoids cut the risk of men experiencing the sexual problem which affects up to half of all middle-aged and older men.  The foods with the greatest benefits include blueberries, cherries, blackberries, radishes and blackcurrant, which contain anthocyanins; as well as citrus fruits, which are packed with flavanones and flavones.The study built on previous research which showed that exercise can reduce the risk of ED. Scientists have now found that eating a diet rich in flavonoids is as beneficial as walking briskly for up to five hours a week. By exercising and eating flavonoid-rich foods, men can cut the risk of experience ED by 21 per cent. Researchers also pinpointed that eating more fruit in general was linked to a 14 per cent reduction in the risk of developing ED.The study, published in 'The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition', was carried out by researchers at the Harvard TH Chan School of Public Health and UEA’s Norwich Medical School.Source  - Independent
3 months 2 weeks ago
Nutrition, Mind, Body
Megan Myers

The knobby, orange root called turmeric is one of the most buzzed-about ingredients right now. You’ve probably had turmeric before — the ground powder is a common ingredient in curries and other Indian dishes.

Turmeric is a member of the ginger family, which accounts for the two roots’ similar appearance and fragrance. It is warm with a bitter edge and a mild peppery bite, making it a great addition to just about any recipe.

Look for turmeric root in the produce section (often near the other more “exotic” ingredients such as long beans and fresh garbanzo beans). Just as with ginger, you will need to peel off the papery skin before grating or slicing for cooking. It should keep in the refrigerator, in an unsealed plastic bag, for 1 to 2 weeks. Ground turmeric is available as a bottled spice and also in the bulk section — perfect if you just want to try a taste of this root.

 Grilled Halibut with Turmeric, Garlic and Capers Recipe

Here are some great ways to use turmeric:

  • With fish, as in Indonesian-Style Fish with Tamarind-Turmeric Sauce
  • Blended into a smoothie for a bit of bite and a brilliant golden color
  • Grated into Greek yogurt for a fabulous dipping sauce
  • Stirred into rice or lentil dishes, or better yet, added before cooking to give everything a yellow tinge
  • Rub onto meats before grilling
  • Whisk into homemade salad dressings
  • Made into a paste for the start of the warming drink known as Golden Milk

Watch our video on turmeric and get inspired:

 Share your favorite turmeric recipes in the comments!

Megan Myers
3 months 2 weeks ago
Nutrition, Mind, Body
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