Cancer, Health and Diet Related News

Higher levels of maternal vitamin D during pregnancy have been linked to better muscle development in children, say researchers.The study on 678 children, published in Endocrine Research,  showed vitamin D levels in the womb were linked to grip strength at the age of four. The team at the University of Southampton say the muscle boost could persist throughout life. Trials are taking place to see how effective pregnancy supplements are.Most vitamin D is made by the skin when exposed to sunlight and supplements are offered during pregnancy.Some doctors have  voiced concerns about vitamin D deficiency as people become more "sun aware" and have linked it with a range of health problems.The team at the University of Southampton investigated the impact of the vitamin in pregnancy. Blood samples were taken 34 weeks into the pregnancy and the vitamin D levels were compared with how tightly their children could squeeze a device in their hand at the age of four. The results showed that women with high levels of vitamin D in the late stages of pregnancy were more likely to have children with greater muscle strength.Dr Nicholas Harvey told the BBC that: "There's some evidence that 'fast' muscle fibres go down in vitamin D deficiency and you get more fat in muscle. If there is deficiency in utero then they may end up with a lower number of numbers of these 'fast' muscle fibres."Source  - BBC
3 months 2 weeks ago
Nutrition, Mind, Body
NEW YORK (AP) — Valisia LeKae has a New Year's resolution that has nothing to do with weight loss, money or watching less TV.
3 months 2 weeks ago
Latest Cancer News/Research
Studies paid for by beverage industry groups came to different conclusions than studies with no conflicts of interest, a new analysis found.
By NICHOLAS BAKALAR
3 months 2 weeks ago
Nutrition, Mind, Body
Studies paid for by beverage industry groups came to different conclusions than studies with no conflicts of interest, a new analysis found.
    





By NICHOLAS BAKALAR
3 months 2 weeks ago
Latest Cancer News/Research
(MedPage Today) -- This week's topics include vitamin E and Alzheimer's, driving distracted, mammography statistics, and global effects of smoking.
3 months 2 weeks ago
Latest Cancer News/Research
A protein that has been at the center of cancer drug design for the last 20 years should not be overlooked according to new research.
3 months 2 weeks ago
Latest Cancer News/Research

A recent Q&A discussed breakfast and the effects of eating in the morning: Doing Without Breakfast? Check out the article and let us know how often you eat breakfast.

How often do you skip breakfast?

Dr. Weil
3 months 2 weeks ago
Nutrition, Mind, Body
Elizabeth Beal

If your blender gets a daily workout, bravo! Smoothies are an easy way to get fruit and veggie goodness into your diet during the winter. And they’re particularly good for those eating dairy-free – the satisfying creaminess of a well-blended smoothie can’t be beat!

Looking to shake things up? Experiment with these add-ins and fall in love with the slurp all over again.

Citrus

Seasonal winter citrus adds brightness and zing to all kinds of smoothies. Try clementines, navel oranges, red grapefruit – these are all at their peak of flavor this time of year. You don’t have to remove all the membranes – just a good peel and chop should do it.

Citrus is especially good paired with vanilla almondmilk or soymilk. This Sunny Citrus Smoothie recipe will get you started. Just sub non-dairy yogurt to make it dairy free.

Sunny Citrus Smoothie

Spices

Warm up that chilly drink with spices typically associated with hot drinks and baking. Try cinnamon, ground allspice, cardamom, ginger, nutmeg or cloves. This Pumpkin Pie Smoothie comes alive with tingly winter spice. We also love this Chai Almond Smoothie.

Pumpkin Pie Smoothie

Cooked Grains

Leftover cooked grains bulk up a smoothie with extra protein and fiber. Try a generous spoonful of brown rice, quinoa or oats. The neutral flavors pair with most combos and give your mixture oomph. We love this Blueberry Muffin Smoothie made with rolled oats, which are light and flaky enough that you don’t even have to cook them first.

Blueberry Muffin Smoothie

Buttery Goodness

It goes without saying that peanut butter is a natural match for strawberries in a smoothie. Don’t stop there! Try almond butter, sunflower seed butter, tahini and coconut butter (sometimes called manna), too! Try spreading the butter on your fruit pieces to keep it from sticking to the sides of your blender. This Chocolate-Almond Banana Smoothie is a favorite with kiddos, as is this Strawberry Almond Butter Smoothie.

Chocolate-Almond Banana Smoothie

Seeds

Edible seeds of all kinds add texture and interest (and a dose of nutrients and fiber) to typical smoothies. Flax is a popular choice, like in this Paradise Found Smoothie but branch out with sesame, sunflower, chia, pumpkin and even poppy seeds. Just be to sure to have some floss handy if your blender isn’t high-powered.

What’s going in your blender this winter? Share your favorite not-so-common smoothie additions below!

allison.burch@wholefoods.com
3 months 2 weeks ago
Nutrition, Mind, Body
A deadly, rare type of soft-tissue cancer may be completely eradicated simply by inhibiting a key protein involved in its growth, UT Southwestern Medical Center researchers report.In the study, published online in Cell Reports, scientists found that inhibiting the action of a protein called BRD4 caused cancer cells to die in a mouse model of malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNSTs).
3 months 2 weeks ago
Latest Cancer News/Research
Scientists have obtained the first detailed molecular structure of a member of the Tet family of enzymes.The finding is important for the field of epigenetics because Tet enzymes chemically modify DNA, changing signposts that tell the cell's machinery "this gene is shut off" into other signs that say "ready for a change.
3 months 2 weeks ago
Latest Cancer News/Research

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