Cancer, Health and Diet Related News

Many patients with advanced stages of cancer, AIDS, tuberculosis, and other diseases die from a condition called cachexia, which is characterized as a 'wasting' syndrome that causes extreme thinness with muscle weakness. Cachexia is the direct cause of roughly 20 percent of deaths in cancer patients. While boosting food intake doesn't help, and no effective therapies are available, new research points to a promising strategy that may stimulate weight gain and muscle strength.
4 days 20 hours ago
Latest Cancer News/Research
Colorectal cancer has been linked to carbohydrate-rich western diets, but the underlying mechanisms have been unclear. A new study shows that gut microbes metabolize carbohydrates in the diet, causing intestinal cells to proliferate and form tumors in mice that are genetically predisposed to colorectal cancer. Treatment with antibiotics or a low-carbohydrate diet significantly reduced tumors in these mice, suggesting that these easy interventions could prevent a common type of colorectal cancer in humans.
4 days 20 hours ago
Latest Cancer News/Research
A gene responsible for stopping the movement of cancer from the lungs to other parts of the body has been discovered by researchers, indicating a new way to fight one of the world’s deadliest cancers. By identifying the cause of this metastasis -— which often happens quickly in lung cancer and results in a bleak survival rate -— scientists are able to explain why some tumors are more prone to spreading than others. The newly discovered pathway may also help researchers understand and treat the spread of melanoma and cervical cancers.
4 days 20 hours ago
Latest Cancer News/Research
Misrepresentations of cardiopulmonary resuscitation on television may lead patients to have unrealistic expectations of what the procedure entails and the likelihood of success.






By DHRUV KHULLAR, M.D.
4 days 22 hours ago
Latest Cancer News/Research
Misrepresentations of cardiopulmonary resuscitation on television may lead patients to have unrealistic expectations of what the procedure entails and the likelihood of success.
By DHRUV KHULLAR, M.D.
4 days 22 hours ago
Nutrition, Mind, Body
Exposure to ultraviolet radiation is the leading cause of skin cancer. But although many of us know this, we still ignore safety recommendations. We investigate why.
4 days 22 hours ago
Latest Cancer News/Research
Governments have agreed the first international standards limiting cancer-causing arsenic pollution in rice, a key move to protect consumers of what is a staple food for billions, the UN said Thursday. The Codex Alimentarius Commission, the top global decision-making body for food standards, issued the decision at its ongoing annual meeting in Geneva. It occurs naturally and is taken up by ...
4 days 23 hours ago
Latest Cancer News/Research
A rare cancer is reported in a new case report in ecancermedicalscience – an unusual case of spindle cell carcinoma in the tongue. Spindle cell carcinoma is an aggressive variant of squamous cell carcinoma. These tumors get their name from their distinctive spindle-shaped cells, readily detectable by immunohistochemistry.
4 days 23 hours ago
Latest Cancer News/Research
Breast cancer awareness campaigns stress saving the breasts - but what about the heart? Breast cancer patients who are positive for the HER2 gene may be at increased risk for heart damage during chemotherapy, according to a new study. Cardio-oncology is a relatively new field of research, emerging as scientists and doctors understand the connections between cancer treatment and the heart.
4 days 23 hours ago
Latest Cancer News/Research

The salt contained in the junk foods and fast foods so many overweight and obese teens consume may be aging their cells, a process that can lead to heart disease. A study presented at this year’s American Heart Association’s Epidemiology & Prevention/Nutrition, Physical Activity & Metabolism Scientific Sessions found that the protective ends of chromosomes (telomeres), which normally shorten with age, were significantly shorter in overweight and obese teens whose sodium intake was high compared to teens who consumed less sodium. In normal weight teens, sodium consumption didn’t affect telomere length. Obesity is associated with increased levels of inflammation, which also speeds telomere shortening, and carrying extra pounds appears to boost sensitivity to salt. The findings suggest that high sodium intake and obesity may act synergistically to accelerate cellular aging, according to study leader Haidong Zhu, M.D., Ph.D., assistant professor of pediatrics at Medical College of Georgia. The solution: cutting back on salty foods may help and may be an easier first step toward health for overweight teens than losing weight, Zhu said. High sodium intake among the teens in the study averaged 4,142 milligrams per day; low-intake averaged 2,388 mg per day. The American Heart Association recommends limiting sodium intake to 1,500 mg per day.

Sources:
Haidong Zhu, et al "High sodium intake is associated with short leukocyte telomere length in overweight and obese adolescents," AHA EPI/NPAM 2014; Abstract #MP64. American Heart Association Epidemiology & Prevention/Nutrition, Physical Activity & Metabolism Scientific Sessions 2014

Dr. Weil
4 days 23 hours ago
Nutrition, Mind, Body

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