Cancer, Health and Diet Related News

By mimicking a viral strategy, scientists have created the first cloaked DNA nanodevice that survives the body's immune defenses. Their success opens the door to smart DNA nanorobots that use logic to spot cancerous tissue and manufacture drugs on the spot to cripple it, as well as artificial microscopic containers called protocells that detect pathogens in food or toxic chemicals in drinking water.
2 days 12 hours ago
Latest Cancer News/Research
Novartis believes GlaxoSmithKline's cancer drugs Votrient, Tafinlar and Mekinist could have more than $1 billion in sales each, the head of the Swiss company's pharmaceutical unit said on Tuesday. "We believe Votrient, Tafinlar, Mekinist - assuming the (combination) trial is positive for overall survival - all three of these products could become blockbusters in our hands," David Epstein told an ...
2 days 12 hours ago
Latest Cancer News/Research

New research demonstrates that lightning might be a possible trigger for migraines and severe headaches. Researchers at the University of Cincinnati found a 31 percent increased risk of headache and a 28 percent increased risk of migraine among individuals who suffer from chronic headaches on days lighting struck within 25 miles of their homes. This study was the first to show a potential link between lightning and headaches. Previous studies have reported conflicting links between headaches and other weather-related changes such as humidity and barometric pressure. The researchers recruited participants for the study from sites in Ohio and Missouri and asked them to record their headache activity in a daily journal for three to six months. Meanwhile, the researchers noted the location of lightning strikes within 25 miles of participants’ homes and recorded the magnitude and polarity of lightning current. Researcher Vincent Martin, M.D. suggested that the headaches could be triggered by electromagnetic waves emitted from lighting or the increases in ozone and other air pollution caused by the electrical discharge, as well as the release of fungal spores associated with lightning.

Source:
Geoffrey V. Martin and Vincent T. Martin, et al, “Lightning and its association with the frequency of headache in migraineurs: An observational cohort study”. Cephalalgia, January 24, 2013 DOI: 10.1177/0333102412474502

Dr. Weil
2 days 12 hours ago
Nutrition, Mind, Body
Eli Lilly and Co. received a key regulatory approval for a new cancer treatment Monday evening, but the drugmaker's shares slipped in premarket trading Tuesday after Lilly also announced a $5.4 billion ...
2 days 13 hours ago
Latest Cancer News/Research
A mechanism to promote growth in damaged nerve cells as a means to restore connections after injury has been uncovered by scientists who have discovered a key molecule that directly regulates nerve cell growth in the damaged nervous system. "We made the surprising discovery that a protein called Retinoblastoma (Rb) is present in adult neurons," explains the lead researcher. "This protein appears to normally act as a brake -- preventing nerve growth."
2 days 13 hours ago
Latest Cancer News/Research
Scientists are in the early stages of an 'e-health technology' project aimed at developing a mobile phone app that can examine blood sample images and diagnose cancer. It would work by taking a magnified image of a blood slide via a microscopic lens attached to the smart phone, which the app would then be able to screen for evidence of leukemia -- a blood cancer.
2 days 13 hours ago
Latest Cancer News/Research
Chronic inflammation in benign prostate tissue is linked to nearly double the risk of having prostate cancer, and high-grade prostate cancer in particular.
2 days 16 hours ago
Latest Cancer News/Research
Alana Sugar


Pea and Asparagus Soup

As a child I knew spring had finally arrived when my grandmother would bring a large bag of fresh green peas into the kitchen, and we would work as a team to shell them. What fun we had! She would blanch them in boiling water and toss them with butter, salt and pepper. She loved to throw them on fresh greens tossed with vinaigrette or her special mayonnaise, or add them to her homemade potato salad. Sometimes she would purée them into soup and add a splash of cream. This Pea and Asparagus Soup would have made my grandmother very happy!    

Fresh peas come in and out of season very quickly. Once they are harvested, you’ll want to eat them as soon as possible because the longer they sit around, the less sweet and tender they are. Remember, they’re best when their pods are firm and green. The smaller peas are generally sweeter, so choose medium-sized pods with smaller, firm peas. The larger and thicker the pod, the more tough and mature the peas inside; these are good for slow simmering in stews and soups.

If you are not planning to eat your fresh peas within a few days, you can easily freeze them for later use. Simply blanch shelled peas in boiling water for a couple of minutes (they will be a beautiful bright green color when they’re ready), then shock them in ice cold water to quickly cool them. Drain and dry them, then store in a freezer-safe resealable plastic bag.


Spring Chicken Salad

If you’ve never had fresh peas, you’re going to love our easy-peasy ideas and recipes, starting with this light and delicious Spring Chicken Salad, perfect as a sandwich filling or an addition to a leafy green salad. While frozen peas are great to keep on hand year round, remember you can use fresh peas in place of frozen peas in most recipes — they are interchangeable. For quick-cooking recipes, start by lightly blanching fresh peas before using. Here are some ideas and recipes:

  • Sauté them with assorted colorful vegetables such as carrots, cauliflower, asparagus and leafy greens. 
  • Serve them as a side dish to meats and tofu or tempeh dishes.
  • Add peas to frittatas, omelets and crêpes. Smoked Salmon Crêpes with Creamed Peas make an ideal Easter brunch or special Sunday breakfast.
  • Add them to soups or stews. Try this Turkish-style Kofta Soup.
  • Toss them into potato, tuna or chicken salad.
  • Add them to a favorite coleslaw recipe.
  • Combine peas with hot cooked pasta or stir into a risotto dish. Be sure to use some quality extra-virgin olive oil and a sprinkling of Parmigiano-Reggiano. Confetti Spring Salad is a delicious combination of pasta and assorted spring vegetables. 
  • Spoon them over leafy greens cooked whole grains, like this Bulgur with Peas and Mint.
  • Mix green peas with other varieties of peas like we do in this Spring Chickpea Salad that combines chickpeas with green peas and a creamy cashew nut dressing.
  • Simmer them in vegetable broth. Purée with fresh mint for a seasonal soup that can be served hot or cold.
  • Stuff them into hot baked potatoes.
  • Add them to stir-fry dishes. Spring Peas and Shrimp Stir Fry with Ginger Soy Glaze combines green peas with sugar snap peas and snow peas.
  • Basmati Pilaf with Peas and Almonds reminds me of my year in India and the many wonderful basmati rice dishes with green peas, spices, herbs, nuts and more.
  • Add to chicken or vegetable potpies. Our Chicken “Pot Pie” with Crunchy Brown Rice Crust is really popular!

Are you a “pass the peas, please” person with a good recipe or a favorite idea? Let me know in the comments below. 

winnie.hsia@gmail.com
2 days 16 hours ago
Nutrition, Mind, Body
Johns Hopkins researchers have discovered an unexpected phenomenon in the organs that produce sperm in fruit flies: When a certain kind of stem cell is killed off experimentally, another group of...
2 days 18 hours ago
Latest Cancer News/Research
An international team led by researchers at UC Davis has shown that the cyclin B1/Cdk1 protein complex, which plays a key role in cell division, also boosts the mitochondrial activity to power that...
2 days 18 hours ago
Latest Cancer News/Research

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